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Tediquette

A living set of things you should do & not do at Ted's Marijuana Forum.

Tediquette

Tediquette

I love Reddit and I would think most people do these days. Besides the never ending river of content to get read in either the articles or the comments themselves, they have a community. One of the biggest goals for TMF is to build a huge community with amazing people. The other night I thought about adding more rules to the forum, but rules themselves suck. Reddit handled this correctly but have a Reddiquette and I make zero tries to hide that I am lifting this. I love the idea, but I will fit it to our community.

These can be added to, amended, or even removed as the community sees fit. At anytime we can come back to this page and examine if we need to have a discussion. I want guidelines and a way we treat each other and the community.

Please do

  • Text rarely expresses how we truly feel. People simply read emotionless text and have to take the time to guess what the intent was. We should never say things in the community that we wouldn't say face-to-face. We are not keyboard warriors.
  • Adhere to the same standards of behavior online that you follow in real life.
  • Read the simple rules that are at the top of the forum, and if you still can't find the, click here.
  • Read the Teddiquette. Read it again every once in a while. Teddiquette is a charted way that we interact, share experiences, and work as a community and adapts to growth.
  • Moderate based on quality, not opinion. Well written and interesting content can be worthwhile, even if you disagree with it.
  • Use proper grammar and spelling. It makes having a discussion much easier, and we should agree that no one is perfect. Allow appropriate criticism to better the reading.
  • Create thread titles that describe the content inside. If you struggle to give a thread context upfront, you should expect the thread to be ignored, deleted, if not both.
  • When linking to a source as the basis of your post, try connecting to the original source of content, and link using the hyperlink tool. Often, a blog will reference another blog, which references another, and so on with everyone displaying ads along the way. Dig through those references and submit a link to the creator, who actually earned the traffic.
  • Post to the most appropriate forum possible.
  • React to posts. There are several options from like, love, or marking it informative. As you would give support for great content, please dislike or report terrible content...but not just because you don't agree.
  • Search for similiar threads before posting. Duplicate posts add nothing new to the community unless time makes a difference in the discussion.
  • Link to the direct version of a media file if the page it was found on isn't the creator's and doesn't add additional information or context. You will see this in YouTube videos being embedded for the sake of ad impressions.
  • Link to canonical and persistent URLs where possible, not temporary pages that might disappear. In particular, use the "permalink" for blog entries, not the blog's index page.
  • Post the full link using the link icon in the editor to a blog or news article. The full link instead of a link shortener gives the reader trust in what they are potentially going to click on.
  • Report any spam, self-promotion, or abusive posts you find.
  • Browse the directory, media, and different forums to look for opportunities to engage and make sure the community is devoid of unwanted posts or comments.
  • Actually read the thread and the content it links to in order to give a reasonable reply in return and avoid just skimming and responding.
  • Feel free to post links to your own content (within reason). But if that's all you ever post, or it always seems to get voted down, take a good hard look in the mirror — you just might be a spammer. A widely used rule of thumb is the 9:1 ratio, i.e. only 1 out of every 10 of your submissions should be your own content.
  • Posts containing explicit material such as nudity, horrible injury etc, add [NSFW] in the title. The site is almost NSFW because of the topic, however, some employers give more latitude so let's help by identifying these threads beforehand.
  • Identify why a post or comment was edited at the bottom of the post so people can understand the context and if it might have changed. Mods and Admins also post why something was edited as well.
  • Read over your submission for mistakes before submitting, especially the title of the submission. Make sure the facts you provide are accurate to avoid any confusion down the line. Posts can only be edited for a short period of time.

Please don't

  • Engage in illegal activity.
  • Submit personal information of yourself or someone else. This includes screenshots of social profiles, addresses, places or work, personal residence, and anything else that could potential give someone else access to a person due to your post. This is grounds for deletion, and possible ban from the forum.
  • Repost deleted/removed information. If you can't find it after you posted it, it's likely because it was against the rules or Tediquette. Adding it again only makes the infraction worse. Deletions usually come with a reason from the mos or admins.
  • Be (intentionally) rude at all. By choosing not to be rude, you increase the overall civility of the community and make it better for all of us.
  • Add fuel to the fire on a topic that might have a divisive nature to it. As reasonable people we should have the ability to research all facts to all sides of the topic to make reasonable contributions. Identifying members who consistently create friction for the sake of creating drama are often trolling. Don't feed trolls.
  • Ask people to Troll others on TMF, in real life, or on other blogs/sites. We aren't your personal army. This is par for the course across the web.
  • Scorch the site in personal attacks that ultimately take away from the conversation.
  • Start a flame war. Just report and "walk away". If you really feel you have to confront them, leave a polite message with a quote or link to the rules, and no more.
  • Insult others. Insults and name calling do not contribute to a rational discussion. Constructive Criticism, however, is appropriate and encouraged.
  • Troll. Trolling does not contribute to the conversation.
  • Judge a story based on your opinion of its source. Quality of content is more important than who created it.
  • Report posts just because you do not like them. You should only be using the report button if the post breaks the community rules.
  • Post hoaxes. If snopes.com has already declared something false, you probably shouldn't be submitting it to TMF.
  • Write titles or posts in ALL CAPS.
  • Editorialize or sensationalize your thread title.
  • Linkjack stories: linking to stories via blog posts that add nothing extra.
  • Use link shorteners to post your content. There are few reasons to hide what you're linking to, and most of them are sneaky.
  • Make comments that lack content. Phrases such as "this", "lol", and "I came here to say this" are not witty, original, or funny, and do not add anything to the discussion.
Published:
Mar 11, 2016
Page Views:
545